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"Act, like we have just enough time.Live, like it runs out today"


HELEN STOREY MBE RDI

 

Dress For Our Time, by artist and designer Helen Storey, uses the power of fashion, science and wonder to communicate some of the world's most complex issues of our time. 

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"Act, like we have just enough time.Live, like it runs out today"


HELEN STOREY MBE RDI

 

Dress For Our Time, by artist and designer Helen Storey, uses the power of fashion, science and wonder to communicate some of the world's most complex issues of our time. 

DRESS FOR OUR TIME COMES ALIVE

The first ever physical embodiment of Dress For Our Time was installed at St Pancras International train station in November 2015. As the gateway to Paris – the city hosting the United Nations Climate Change conference COP 21 – many of the delegates that passed through the station came face to face with the world’s first digital couture dress dedicated to exploring climate change and its human impact. 

Developed in partnership with Holition, the dress digitally displayed data – extracted from a major study of the global risks of future shifts in ecosystems due to climate, which showed the impact of climate change on our physical world. It showed the planet as it will be, if we don't do enough. 

The dress was then displayed at the United Nations in Geneva in February 2016, as part of the TEDxPlaceDesNations Transforming Lives event. Its appearance at the UN in Geneva began a dialogue around migration and the experience of refugees, and sparked provocative and inspirational conversations on social media.  

The dress itself is made from a tent (which is no longer in useable condition) gifted to the project by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). In giving the tent a second life it gives this public art installation an unbreakable bond to humanity and represents the importance of nurturing and protecting all people and safeguarding generations to come.  It is a powerful symbol of what it means to be human and the precarious nature of our existence.

*According to NASA “Multiple studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals show that 97 percent or more of actively publishing climate scientists agree: Climate-warming trends over the past century are very likely due to human activities. In addition, most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position.” To see a full list please see here.  For a full list of Global Organisations please see here

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How One Person Can Make a Difference


How One Person Can Make a Difference


Together we can start to make sense of the complex issues of our time.

We are focusing on climate change and the refugee crisis.

Through Instagram and Twitter, using the hashtag #dress4ourtime, people from around the world have submitted their ideas of how to build a sustainable future.

1. Explore these ideas on our social grid

2. Submit your own via #dress4ourtime

3. Engage with others, collaborate, lead by example

PLEASE SHARE WITH #DRESS4OURTIME

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Truth and Realisation


Truth and realisation

Truth and Realisation


Truth and realisation

Helen Storey, former fashion designer, now social artist and designer is one of London College of Fashion’s leading researchers; she uses fashion and the power of collaboration to investigate prevalent global issues of today. When she learnt that we consume 30%** more resources each year than our planet can replenish, and that if we continue at this rate we will need at least 3 more planets to survive, she knew that her work required her to address these subjects and find ways to engage us in the urgent issues of our time.

Two years in the making, Helen has bought together a range of individuals from different disciplines, including Holition, Unilever, Met Office and the UNHCR, with backgrounds in science, business, education, technology humanitarian work and fashion, to explore ways to engender a public debate about this critical question.  Dress For Our Time at St Pancras was the first public art installation which will form Chapter One and marks the beginning of these investigations. Chapter Two of Dress for our Time will follow in summer 2016.

** SOURCE: WWF’s The Living Planet Report (2014) a science-based analysis of the health of our planet and the impact of human activity.

"It’s rare that there’s a piece of fashion which is designed not to influence what you buy but to shift the way you think. It’s even rarer to find a piece created to promote the discussion of climate science. But that’s Helen Storey for you." - Lucy siegle, The guardian